Pro Tem is the Bilingual Newspaper of Glendon College. Founded in 1962, it is York University’s oldest student-run publication, and Ontario’s first bilingual newspaper. All content is produced and edited by students, for students.

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Pro Tem est le journal bilingue du Collège Glendon. Ayant été fondé en 1962, nous sommes la publication la plus ancienne de l’Université York ainsi que le premier journal bilingue en Ontario. Tout le contenu est produit et édité par les étudiants, pour les étudiants.

David’s Discs: What to check out (or not) this month

David’s Discs: What to check out (or not) this month

Album: Time & Space by Turnstile

 cr: genius.com

cr: genius.com

Baltimore hardcore punk band Turnstile return with their sophomore effort, Time & Space. At just twenty-five minutes long, this album seems confident that it will leave an impact in spite of its brief runtime; however, whether it does or not will vary from listener to listener. The album is pretty consistent in tone and energy throughout, which might make the record come off as monotonous or tiresome to some — but not to me. I found myself thoroughly whipped up in the juvenile aggression on display here, with the confrontational hooks keeping it engaging from track to track. Even now, I find myself wrestling with the urge to yell “I’ll do it again! Yeah, I’ll do it again!” at innocent passersby, and other such rude and unruly public behaviours.

The one song that breaks the mood is “Moon,” which uses clean vocals. As a result, this tune is a bit of a grower, and certainly nowhere as immediate as the other tracks here. Speaking of clean vocals, they are sprinkled throughout the record here and there and, to me, this is the weakest aspect of Turnstile’s sound. The screamed vocals do such a great job at getting the blood pumping that the entrance of clean vocals can have the effect of water being splashed in your face. That said, on the whole, Time & Space is a short, wild ride through some of the best hardcore punk out there right now.

My Score: 8/10

 

 cr: Pitchfork

cr: Pitchfork

 

Album: In a Poem Unlimited by U.S. Girls

In her latest album, In a Poem Unlimited, Meghan Remy (also known as U.S. Girls) brings her densely lyrical style of songwriting and backs it up with some dance-pop instrumentation. Through her lyrics, the Toronto via Chicago indie singer-songwriter muses on some interesting socio-political topics, ranging from women’s safety to the legacy of Barack Obama. These musings makes the album pretty engaging from a thematic and lyrical perspective. Musically, however, it’s pretty ho-hum — just some pleasant melodies with some upbeat and slightly jazzy instrumentation. Remy’s voice is not very confident or distinct either. She carries the tunes well enough, but never comes out swinging. The record is pleasant but, true to its title, this album would work best as a collection of poems.

My Score: 6/10

Call Me By My Name: Examining the Link Between Language and Mental Health

Call Me By My Name: Examining the Link Between Language and Mental Health

Une poupée pas comme les autres: Nouveautés dans le mois des femmes

Une poupée pas comme les autres: Nouveautés dans le mois des femmes