Pro Tem is the Bilingual Newspaper of Glendon College. Founded in 1962, it is York University’s oldest student-run publication, and Ontario’s first bilingual newspaper. All content is produced and edited by students, for students.

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Pro Tem est le journal bilingue du Collège Glendon. Ayant été fondé en 1962, nous sommes la publication la plus ancienne de l’Université York ainsi que le premier journal bilingue en Ontario. Tout le contenu est produit et édité par les étudiants, pour les étudiants.

Q&A with Glendon Alumni: Spotlight on Krista McNamara

Q&A with Glendon Alumni: Spotlight on Krista McNamara

Q: Tell us about your involvement at Glendon (what did you study, any clubs you participated in)

A: I was in Canadian Studies! In my coursework, I focused primarily on Indigenous-Settler relations. I graduated in 2014 with a BA and the Certificate of Bilingualism. During my first year, I volunteered with Peace by PEACE. Then, I went on to be a councillor, VP Bilingual, and then speaker with the GCSU. I was also Director of Awareness, Coordinator of GLgbt*, and worked as a Don of Learning Activities in Wood residence. I worked in the student recruitment office (the best!), volunteered with ASAY a handful of times, and was a First for the Red team during Frosh Week. Last but not least, I was an Infinite Reach Facilitator with the Métis Nation of Ontario at Glendon… Clearly I spent far too much of my 5 years on co-curricular activities!

Q: What do you miss about Glendon? Have any regrets about your time here?

A: I’d say that I miss the cafeteria, but that’s obviously a lie. I do miss the space and my friends, our big crowd of loud queer people. I miss how we lived as a community, sharing meals, epic GLgbt* pub nights, and our struggles. I grew a lot during my time at Glendon. My biggest regret is not having studied enough and not working hard on my academics. Don’t get me wrong, I had a few A’s in the courses I really loved (Anishinaabemowin with Maya Chacaby, Queer Cultures with Kato), but I bombed a lot of “easy” classes. So, looking back, I’d say, make sure you study and hand in your work friends!

Q: What are you up to now?

A: I’m a high school teacher! Well, currently an unqualified one, working in Eeyou Istchee (The People’s Land) in a community called Mistissini. I’m headed off to teacher’s college next year to get my BEd.

Q: How did Glendon help you get to where you are now (or where you want to be)?

A: Glendon gave me the space to grow and become myself. Queer, Franco-Ontarian, Indigenous, Feminist; it taught me some of the important terminology that I needed to place myself in the world. I went to école secondaire Le Caron, and Glendon gave me the opportunity to keep studying in French, which is really important for me personally and professionally. I currently teach Science and Chemistry in French.

Q: Any advice for students still at Glendon?

A: Keep working hard. Enjoy your time, even though it’s stressful as hell. Make taking care of yourself a priority. And maybe use one of those free GCSU agendas, they actually come in handy.

Argentina Symposium: March 11th at Glendon College

Argentina Symposium: March 11th at Glendon College

#GLExit: More than a Meme, A Call for an Independent Student Union

#GLExit: More than a Meme, A Call for an Independent Student Union