Pro Tem is the Bilingual Newspaper of Glendon College. Founded in 1962, it is York University’s oldest student-run publication, and Ontario’s first bilingual newspaper. All content is produced and edited by students, for students.

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Pro Tem est le journal bilingue du Collège Glendon. Ayant été fondé en 1962, nous sommes la publication la plus ancienne de l’Université York ainsi que le premier journal bilingue en Ontario. Tout le contenu est produit et édité par les étudiants, pour les étudiants.

Through The Window

Through The Window

Slender, ruler-straight planks of wood frame the world outside.

Potent sunrays slant into the house,

creating diamond-shaped zones of heat on the carpeted floor.

Looking out the window, what do I see?

Trees, swaying in the heavy breeze.


I cool my forehead on the hard glass, eyes closed and mouth open.

My hot breath issues a shifting, disappearing patch of condensation.

I hear a rushing, whispering sound.

Looking out the window, what do I see?

Winter’s heavy coat and stillness.


A capricious black squirrel catches my languid gaze.

Its small body moves in a sinuous wave across my field of vision

and with a twitch it is gone up the maple tree.

Looking out the window, what do I see?

Chickadees I wish I could shrink myself to accompany for a lark.


The air is surprisingly brisk
and rays of sunlight twinkle off each fat, falling flake.
I stick out a black mitten; on its brushed surface I observe fractals:
the sacred geometry of stars that have jumped from their place in the night sky
And landed, shrunken, on my hand.

The miniature architecture of each fragile shape mesmerizes me.
A bitter wind slaps my uncovered face, prompting me to close the door
and retreat into the warm house to observe the unfurling of a winter storm.
Through the glass, I see flurries stirred by the wind:
a whimsical white scene.

The children across the street escape from their pristine homes
and frisk around in the abundant whiteness.
A snowman begins to take shape.
The sun, a dim orb, peers lazily from behind a thick cloud cover.
Looking out the window, what do you see?

Edited by Ayla Sljivar on February 4th, 2019

When I opened the door, it was snowing

Anike Morrison, Contributor

EN 15 Lines

The air is surprisingly brisk

And rays of sunlight twinkle off each fat, falling flake.

I stick out a black mitten; on its brushed surface I observe fractals:

The sacred geometry of stars that have jumped from their place in the night sky

And landed, shrunken, on my hand.


The miniature architecture of each fragile shape mesmerizes me.

A bitter wind slaps my uncovered face, prompting me to close the door

And retreat into the warm house to observe the unfurling of a winter storm.

Through the glass, I see flurries stirred by the wind:

A whimsical white scene.


The children across the street escape from their pristine home

And frisk around in the abundant whiteness.

A snowman begins to take shape.

The sun, a dim orb, peers lazily from behind a thick cloud cover.

Looking out the window, what do you see?


Why is Glendon So White?

Why is Glendon So White?

Winter Lights at Ontario Place

Winter Lights at Ontario Place